Do YOUR Best

“We’re all absolutely equal in having the opportunity to make the most of what we have.” –Coach John Wooden

Coach Wooden is considered by many to be one of the leading coaches of all time.

 

To do your best is part of the purpose of life. Plan for it and persevere. Focus on your capacities to serve more than comparing yourself to what others have or have not done.

–David

 

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Wooden on Leadership

Coach John Wooden coached 10 national championship teams and inspired many with books, speeches, and his Pyramid of Success. He lived to almost 100 years. – David

Posted in Best-Self Leadership, Freedom to Flourish, Grit, Leadership and Empowerment, Plan for School & Life | Tagged | Leave a comment

5 Leadership Best Practices

Dr. Dionne Rosser-Mims taught 5 key practices for leaders at the Troy University Leadership Conference 2018, citing authors Kouzes and Posner:

  1. Model the Way
  2. Inspire a Shared Vision
  3. Challenge the Process
  4. Enable others to Act
  5. Encourage the Heart

APPLICATIONS YOU CAN USE TO OPERATIONALIZE THE BEST PRACTICES

  1. Choose the best practices you want to use into your Leadership Philosophy and Plan (your philosophy and best practices use for implementation).
  2. Write your leadership philosophy, outline your best practices for implementation, and list your goals for action (what you seek to do).
  3. State intent with others for how you intend to think, make decisions, and act (this helps them understand what and why you are are doing certain things–this models the way, inspires shared vision, challenges the process for those who do not plan or state intent, enables others better, and encourages others because you provide an example and possibly inspire them to also take action).
  4. Explain and show how writing and sharing your philosophy, practices, and plan is part of you modeling the way and inspiring a shared vision for how leaders can serve and develop people.
  5. Encourage others to plan and state intent so they will focus on the vision of the organization aligned with callings in their heart plus help you understand better and faster how to enable them to act.

–David

Thanks to Dr. Rosser-Mims for sharing her insights in the leadership conference and helping me to share highlights with you. She is a past honoree as Outstanding Professor of the Year for Troy University. She serves as Associate Dean of the College of Education.

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Achievable Resolutions

To Plan, Decide, and Act to Achieve, Improve, Solve, Change, Transform

I developed this 7-Step Method to help my seminar students who often set the same “New Year Resolution” year after year. Both they and I have done better identifying priorities and taking action.

7 Steps to Set a Resolution that increase your chance of success:

If you answer these seven questions as an outline for your plan, you will boost likelihood of success. You will better internalize the results you seek and why you should follow through, plus have a plan that helps you invest enough time to give you a chance to succeed. Research—mine and others—suggests over 50% of people quit on resolutions, most within one month.

  1. Mission (Purpose)
  2. Vision & Goals (Desired Results)
  3. Solutions (Strategy that could work if implemented)
  4. Motivation (Results if you succeed, if you quit, why you should persevere)
  5. Choice (Decision on if the resolution results are worth the time and resources)
  6. Systems and Structures for Success (Create automatic actions for success)
  7. Assessment and Accountability (Integrity and feedback)

Main reasons for failing:

  1. Lose focus on the result, benefit, and commitment felt at the time of setting the resolution. There is science behind the benefit of writing your resolution result and plan plus reading regularly to remember and internalize.
  2. Never truly get started because they do not plan for the hours and times to invest, which includes appointments with self and others, plus identifying what to reduce to make time for the new priorities. If you need 5-10 hours per week to get something done and do not plan for or implement that time commitment, most fail and often never know why. This often requires new habits or at least re-defining balance for awhile. An Olympic athlete or a working professional going back to school at night for a few years usually chooses to invest more time in the bigger goal and less time in less important activities like excessive tv, social media, or hanging out (note: “excessive” because some of those can be good unless it gets excessive and shifts from good renewal to excessive escapism). The average person spends over 20 hours weekly watching tv—the dedicated Olympian or parent going to school to make a better life makes better choices—at least until the resolution is completed.

Stories of Succeeding using this Method:

Writing books. Col. Stretch Dunn (USA Retired, 1943-2017) and I wrote two books, Professionalism Under Stress and Patriotism in Action, on time and budget using my 7 Step Method. We used the plan template to outline what we wanted to do, why, and how, then decided together and signed the accountability partner agreement. If you want to keep a promise, ask a West Point graduate trained in doing “the harder right” to be your partner😊. If you have a big enough “why” and internalize the importance to you and others you value, plus outline a plan with potential to succeed, then persist, you can do most anything.

Graduating school. I finished my doctoral dissertation and graduated a year faster than most in my class mainly because I realized early on I needed to invest more hours in the main thing that final year–research and writing on my dissertation. Like most students, I felt motivated and busy though an honest assessment of how I was spending my time motivated me to make changes in time priorities that made the difference.

Stopping bad habits. A grandmother attended my weekend workshop. She confessed, she had tried to quit smoking for years. Question 4 helped her finally succeed: Motivation. She wanted to live to see her grandchildren graduate school. I suggested she post a photo of her grandchildren on her mirror and ask daily, which is most important: “my grandchildren or my cigarettes?” She grinned at the suggestion, paused, thought, agreed, then she quit smoking. She internalized her big “why” and that made the difference.

This and more content are provided for you in the planbook. To see or print a complimentary copy of the planbook you can use to outline your goals for the 7 Areas of Life, plus plan an achievable resolution:

http://lifeleadersinstitute.org/publications-and-presentations/7-steps-to-set-and-achieve-a-resolution/

Posted in Best-Self Leadership, Earning Empowerment, Freedom to Flourish, Master Your Goliaths, Motivation, Plan for School & Life, Positive Actions to Lead Your LIfe, Professionalism Under Stress, Resolutions, The 7 Areas of Life | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Courage to Dream

Courage

Many of us hold back, sometimes unconsciously, on pursuing dreams–because of fear. We sometimes dwell on possible negative outcomes like failure or embarrassment.

Seminar students often say, they stay in their “comfort zones” too much because of “what people might think” if they tried something special. They also admit they hesitate instinctively when seeking goals outside their comfort zones.

When that happens, we need a bigger vision, a “why” to expand thinking, actions, and expectations. When we expand expectations of ourselves, that expanded vision becomes part of our new comfort zone, which our instincts will strive to fulfill.

Fear of embarrassment is a self-induced barrier. We sometimes let the fear of what people will think if we try and fail hold us back. But, the truth often is, they likely admire us more if they see our courage to try and persist through adversity. 

What percentage of the time will you succeed if you do not try? 

Consider the people you admire–they likely have tried, failed, and kept trying to fulfill ideas in which they believe, even if others could see their flaws and failures. You likely admire their courage. Success stories usually include recollections of desire and dedication–not successes at goals requiring little effort or risk.

Follow the example of those you admire. Allow yourself to try and sometimes fall short as you give yourself more chances to succeed as well as grow capacity in courage and commitment.

Just do your best, learn and improve from failures and successes, and enjoy the freedom that comes with courage.

May you PLAN and LEAD your LIFE and share with others. –David

Source: adapted from an excerpt in Suggestions for Successful Living: Positive Ideas for the 7 Areas of Life by Dr. David Dyson (1994). Author web site: www.DrDavidDyson.com

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